Advice

What is the difference between loads and lots?

What is the difference between loads and lots?

“Lots of” is standard English; “loads of”(originally referring to a truck or lorry load of something) is an exaggeration, and colloquial. If you are writing anything formal, don’t write “loads of”.

Can we use loads of love instead of lots of love?

Both are fine to use! It’s normal to write ‘Lots of love’. It’s unusual to write ‘Loads of love’. Even though grammatically correct, it can be used to impress/stress the expression.

Can we say love you loads?

For your question loads of love is an adverb which simply means you have loads of love. But I love you is specific, you’re expressing your love to some one by saying ‘I love you’. Loads of love is generic, I love you is specific.

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How do you use lot in a sentence?

a large number or amount.

  1. There’s still lots of food on your plate.
  2. We had lots of fun at the fair today.
  3. We took lots of measurements.
  4. Children need lots of love and affection.
  5. Lots of people have complained about the noise.
  6. Inflation has caused lots of problems.

Is loads countable or uncountable?

Loads/a load of something is a lot of it. We’ve had a load of problems ever since we got the new stuff. It costs loads of money. (uncountable) Your load is how much work you have.

What does like you loads mean?

1 tr to have a great attachment to and affection for. 2 tr to have passionate desire, longing, and feelings for. 3 tr to like or desire (to do something) very much.

Are lots more correct?

Is it grammatically correct to say “a lot more”? – Quora. “A lot more” is informal. It has the advantage that it can be used both with things that are counted and with things that are measured. “Much more” and “many more” are formal alternatives but they are used with measurable things or counted things respectively.

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How do you use lots of in a sentence?

Lots/Plenty of and Other Quantifiers. Both lots and plenty are quantifiers used in affirmative sentences. They can be placed before singular or plural countable and uncountable nouns. Although lots and plenty are acceptable in academic writing, their usage is considered to be informal.

Is it ‘loads of’ or ‘loads of’?

“Lots of” is standard English; “loads of” (originally referring to a truck or lorry load of something) is an exaggeration, and colloquial. If you are writing anything formal, don’t write “loads of”.

What is the difference between ‘lots of’ and ‘loads of’ restaurants?

As others have mentioned, grammatically there is no difference when used in the sentence “There are loads/lots of great restaurants”, but loads of is not appopriate in formal situations, especially writing. When in doubt, go for “lots of” as it is fairly neutral. e.g. “There are many great restaurants” (many+plural countable noun)

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Can you use lots and plenty in academic writing?

Both lots and plenty are quantifiers used in affirmative sentences. They can be placed before singular or plural countable and uncountable nouns. Although lots and plenty are acceptable in academic writing, their usage is considered to be informal. In formal academic writing, it is more appropriate to use many, much, and more.