General

Why is the hole in the tree filled with cement?

Why is the hole in the tree filled with cement?

Nathan Radley tells Jem that he filled it with cement because the tree was sick, or dying. Later on in the story though, Jem asks Atticus what he thinks about the dying tree. He says he thinks the tree looks perfectly healthy.

What is the significance of the knothole in To Kill a Mockingbird?

The tree has a significant meaning by reason of the similarities with Boo Radley. In the novel, the tree is described slowly dying by Nathan Radley due to the knothole. Certain trees have knot holes because it is a method for them to heal after a branch had died from a disease or if the tree was injured.

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Who filled the knothole in the tree with cement and what was the reason given for filling the knothole?

Radley tells Scout and Jem in their conversation with Mr. Radley about why he filled the knothole in the tree. Scout and Jem had a type of communication with Boo Radley because of the knothole. Boo would fill the knothole with items that created an interest for Scout and Jem.

What excuse did Mr Radley give for filling in the hole with cement?

What reason does Boo’s brother, Nathan Radley, give Jem for filling in the knothole with cement? He says that’s what you do when a tree is dying. He says that’s what you do when a tree is growing too fast. He says Boo did it because he’s crazy.

Why does Jem cry when the tree is filled with cement?

– Mr. Nathan fills in the hole with cement, claiming the tree is dying. 63 – Jem cries about the tree because he realizes the tree isn’t really dying and he is aware of what Nate Radley is trying to do.

Why does Jem cry about the hole in the tree being filled?

Jem cries because Boo’s father, Nathan Radley, had cemented up the hole in the tree. Jem cries not just because there will be no more presents forthcoming but also (and especially) because this cuts off the children’s contact with their new “phantom friend,” Boo.

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Why does Jem cry when the Knothole is filled?

In Chapter Seven, Jem cries when he realizes that Mr. Radley cemented the knot-hole in the tree, not because it was dying, but because he aimed to keep Boo from leaving the children gifts. This is one more example of how the Radley’s cut Boo off from the world.

What happens to the knothole in the oak tree?

When Nathan realizes what is going on, he fills up the knothole with cement. He explains to Jem when confronted that he did it because the tree is dying. However, the tree is healthy. It is evident that Nathan wanted to cut off the communication between his brother and the children.

What happens with the knothole in Chapter 7 Who do you think is responsible?

Nathan Radley plugged the hole. When Jem asks him why, the man says he did it because the tree is dying: “You plug ’em with cement when they’re sick. You ought to know that, Jem.” How does Jem find out that the explanation for filling the knot-hole is false?

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What does Lee accomplish by having Jem ask Nathan Radley about the cement in the knothole?

What does Lee accomplish by having Jem ask Nathan Radley about the cement in the knot hole. It shows conflicting beliefs between Atticus and Nathan. Nathan trying to stop his brother and Atticus seeing the best in people. What does Jem’s resistance to cry in front of Scout foreshadow?

What did Jem find in the knothole?

Late that fall, another present appears in the knothole—two figures carved in soap to resemble Scout and Jem. The figures are followed in turn by chewing gum, a spelling bee medal, and an old pocket watch. The next day, Jem and Scout find that the knothole has been filled with cement. When Jem asks Mr.

How does Jem find out the explanation for filling the knot hole is false?

How does Jem find out that the explanation for filling the knot-hole is false? Skeptical of Nathan Radley’s explanation, Jem asks Atticus to look at the tree and tell him if it appears to be dying. Atticus replies, “Why no, son, I don’t think so. That tree’s as healthy as you are, Jem.”